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  • Fashion Undressed: The Journey of the Jumper at The Southbank Centre

    Photo 28-05-2016, 16 39 35

     

    Last week our Founder Ayesha Mustafa was a part of an insightful panel at the Southbank Centre for the Fashion Undressed series, featuring workshops and talks seeking to celebrate vibrant fashions of the UK.

    The panel saw Sarah Klymkiw – Head of Education at Traid, Safia Minney – Founder of People Tree and The World Fair Trade Day, and our very own Ayesha Mustafa discuss the unseen journey of the clothes we wear, answering key questions on the global journey of clothing and the importance of knowing and understanding this process, and the person who made the clothing.

    Photo 28-05-2016, 16 19 08

  • The List: A Roundup of Fashion, Films, Restaurants and Hotels To Help You Lead a More Sustainable Lifestyle

    With Fashion Revolution Day celebrated on April 24th around the world, there is an awakening of consumers who want to know what goes inside the products they buy and who makes them. Here at Fashion ComPassion we have the same ethos. So we’ve compiled a list from restaurants, films & fashion to help you become a more conscious consumer.

    1) Fifteen

    Run by Jamie Oliver with an amazing apprentice scheme helping young unemployed people. The success of this restaurant earned it a TV show “Jamie’s Kitchen”, today the restaurant has branched out to Cornwall and Amsterdam. Why not eat happily knowing that you’re helping employ the country's future leaders?

    2) UK Green Film Festival

    Join the UK’s only celebration of environmental films. There will be touring the country from June 1st until 8th. Packed with special guest speakers from around the world from the film and the environmental movements.

    3) Carlton Guldsmeden Hotel

    Enjoy a stay in the worlds greenest city Copenhagen, in the worlds greenest hotel Guldsmeden. Our favourite of the seven Guldsmeden hotels is Carlton Guldsmeden. Complete with 74 spacious rooms with their signature Balinese style.

    4) Sewlomax Lipstick Bag

    This quirky eco conscious bag and it is handmade. A percentage of the sales help underprivileged youth in the UK, Malawi and India with the charity Wings of Hope. Buy it here.

    5) Lo Top By From Somewhere

    This mismatch of rare jersey material looks amazing, be bold and wear this, it would look great with baggy boyfriend jeans.

    6) Krze Studio Bag

    kryze

    Make a bold statement with this IT bag of this season. This bag is vegan and eco friendly. This is the perfect day bag buy it here.

    7) Sherbet Dress By Bhaloshop

    This sherbet dress by Bhalo is a gorgeous pastel colour which is on trend this season, made by Fair Trade organisation, Thanapara Swallows.

    8) Uma In Hot Pink And Nude

    These beautiful Beyond Skin Uma sandals are vintage inspired, which is in this season. Made with 100% vegan leather, Wouldn’t you just feel fabulous strutting in these ethical shoes?

    9) The Upcycle: Beyond Sustainability

    A very interesting read for those of you interested in fashion and sustainability. This book gives practical tips on how you can put sustainable choices in practice. Another big plus, is that the foreword is by Bill Clinton.

  • 2013: The Year of Sustainable Fashion!

    In less than 24 hours, we will be welcoming in the new year and saying goodbye 2013! But, before doing that, we thought it would be a great idea to look back at this year and see what 2013 brought to the sustainable fashion industry. So without further ado, here is our top 5 picks of 2013 sustainable fashion events!

    1. SOURCE Summit 2013

    The SOURCE Summit is considered to be one of the most important event for fashion and sustainability. The SOURCE Summit is considered to be one of the most important event for fashion and sustainability.

    In July, the SOURCE Summit 2013 conference was held at the Crystal in London. The summit is considered to be one of the most important event for fashion and sustainability as united global retailers leaders and pioneering brands from all over the world in aid of addressing the challenges faced by the sustainable fashion industry. Ayesha Mustafa, founder and director of Fashion ComPassion, was apart of the Summit's panel for the Retailer forum, a forum which aimed to bring retailers together with entrepreneurs and brands to debate about how to increase the availability of sustainable fashion in the mainstream fashion industry.

    2. GCC Capsule Collection Launch On Net-a-Porter

    Emma Watson models the NET-A-PORTER.COM & GCC Capsule Collection. (Original photos by Natalie Brewster). Emma Watson models the NET-A-PORTER.COM & GCC Capsule Collection. (Original photos by Natalie Brewster).

    September saw the Green Carpet Challenge and Net-a-Porter launch a world wide exclusive capsule collection, where all the pieces were created in accordance with GCC® ethical criteria and produced to the highest sustainable standards. The GCC capsule collection featured ten gowns from five of best British designers; Victoria Beckham, Burberry Prorsum, Chistopher Kane, Erdem and Roland Mouret. The collection was then modelled by actress and sustainable fashion campaigner Emma Watson as part of the launch.

    3. Fashion Revolution Day

    Fashion Revolution Day will offer a voice to everyone in the fashion ecosystem who is bringing change. Fashion Revolution Day will offer a voice to everyone in the fashion ecosystem who is bringing change.

    This year also saw the creation the annual commemorative day Fashion Revolution Day. Initiated by Carry Somers and Orsola de Castro, Fashion Revolution Day is to commemorate and tribute the victims of the Rana Plaza and all the other tragedies that have occurred in the name of fashion. Taking its main inspiration from International Women’s Day, Fashion Revolution Day aims to show the world that change in the fashion industry is possible and that we should celebrate those who want create a more sustainable fashion future and give them a platform to voice their concerns. The day also intends celebrate good practice in the industry as well as highlight the main problem areas which need to be tackled such as worker’s rights and health and safety conditions.

    Check out Fashion Revolution Day Facebook page here.

    4. Estethica SS2014 at London Fashion Week!

    5 Top Picks from Estethica SS14 - People Tree, Bottletop, Liora Lassalle, Katrien Van Hecke and Beautiful Soul London. 5 Top Picks from Estethica SS14 - People Tree, Bottletop, Liora Lassalle, Katrien Van Hecke and Beautiful Soul London.

    Estethica has become one of the industry’s leading showcases of eco sustainable design, supporting over 100 pioneering designers and promoting awareness about ethical fashion around the world. This year's SS14 was exceptional, showcasing talents from the likes of People Tree, Bottletop, Liora Lassalle, Katrien Van Hecke and Beautiful Soul London. Check out our whole review of Estethica SS2014 here!

    5. Ethical Fashion Initiative

    'Not Charity, Just Work' - slogan of Ethical Fashion Initiative. 'Not Charity, Just Work' - slogan of Ethical Fashion Initiative.

    It has been a phemonal year for the Ethical Fashion Initiative (EFI). EFI gives artisans in Africa and Haiti access to designers like Stella McCartney and Vivienne Westwood, helping ethical fashion into the mainstream market. Operated through the wider ‘Poor Communities and Trade Programme’ launched by the ITC, the Ethical Fashion Initiative enables international fashion companies and distributors to source from African communities, without bias in price or quality, therefore allowing groups of marginalised artisans to become part of the larger value chain. Simone Cipriani, head of the EFI, was named among the Business of Fashion Top 500 influential people who are shaping the global fashion industry.

    Find out more about the Ethical Fashion Initiative here.

    What do you think? What are your top sustainable fashion event from 2013? Let us know in the comments!

  • Guest Blogger of the Month: Adore, Reflect, Sustain

    Emma Waight from Adore, Reflect, SustainWhat is the name of your blog?

    Adore, Reflect, Sustain

    Tells us about your blog and why you started it.

    I started my blog Adore, Reflect, Sustain more than 3 years ago because I was studying for a research-based Masters in ethical fashion and I wanted a space to promote ethical fashion and also have an online presence for when I started looking for jobs. It changed direction a little once I started my PhD so this year I also launched ethicalhighstreet.co.uk as a space to promote everyday ethical shopping choices, not just in fashion but for the high street as a whole.

    Why is sustainable fashion so important?

    I do see a slight distinction between ethical fashion and sustainable fashion. Sustainable fashion is slow fashion, kind to planet and people. The problem with fast fashion is that we have lost an understanding of how clothing is made, it’s so easily accessible and cheap; we’ve almost lost respect for the process. The way it stands the fashion industry just can’t be sustainable. Sustainable fashion is important because it puts the love back into clothing so we buy fewer but better quality clothes, making our environmental footprint as low as possible.

    How would you describe your style / fashion sense?

    Increasingly eclectic! I like to look feminine but I don’t think I can get away with some of the super girly clothes I wore a few years ago. I love vintage clothes and the traditional English heritage look. At the moment I wear a lot of skinny jeans and skirts with baggy sweaters.

    Who do you admire in the world of sustainable fashion?

    I love Lily Cole because she has used her incredibly prominent place in the fashion industry to promote ethical fashion through the Environmental Justice Foundation and also through her own sustainable fashion brand The North Circular. There are lots of amazing people who have dedicated their life and career to changing things in the industry.

    What are your favourite ethical brands and why?

    People Tree is an all-time favourite. They have got a lot more fashion-conscious over the last few years and they always have some stunning dresses and great quality too. Locally to me in Southampton, WhoMadeYourPants? manufacture and sell gorgeous underwear with a great story at its heart – they offer jobs to local marginalised women who might otherwise struggle to get jobs because they have a low level of English or lack British qualifications.

    What are your top tips for buying ethical and sustainable products?

    There are so many wonderful, ethical brands out there you just have to go and look for them. Buy classic pieces which won’t date and don’t be afraid of new fabrics like bamboo or milk fibre. I don’t think you have to boycott the big brands, just make sure you buy their ethical/sustainable products (most of the big names offer organic or Fairtrade cotton t-shirts for example) to show that there is consumer demand.

    What are your plans for the future?

    I am writing up my PhD on second-hand consumption at the moment. Adore, Reflect, Sustain will continue to be my personal blog but I want to grow Ethical High Street into a bigger and better resource for shoppers.

    What are your 3 top picks of the Fashion Compassion website?

    Emma’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Burqa’s Silk Ikat Cocktail Dress (£165), Bhalo’s Cloudgazer Skirt (£80) and GUNAS’s Admiral Baguette Clutch (£260). Emma’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Burqa’s Silk Ikat Cocktail Dress (£165), Bhalo’s Cloudgazer Skirt (£80) and GUNAS’s Admiral Baguette Clutch (£260).

    For my top picks I've choosen; the Burqa's Silk Ikat Cocktail dress, for its sexy shape and gorgeous colour, the Bhalo's Cloudgazer skirt, as I'm loving long skirts at the moment, and GUNAS’s Admiral Baguette Clutch. I always worry about anything very embellished (not knowing who has sewn on all those sequins) so it’s great to find a beautiful alternative to put my conscience at ease.

    Check out Emma’s Adore, Reflect, Sustain blog here and ethicalhighstreet.co.uk here.

    Emma is also on Twitter.

  • Fashion ComPassion's Christmas Wish List 2013!

    With Christmas just around the corner, we here at Fashion ComPassion HQ are getting into the festive spirit and writing up our christmas wish lists! We thought long and hard about our favourite ethical and sustainable fashion products and, after much consideration, we've managed narrowed our list down to 10 items.

    So, without further ado, here is Fashion ComPassion's top 10 must-haves for Christmas 2013!

    1. Midori Dress - Beautiful Soul London

    Be bold in Beautiful Soul London's ‘Midori Dress’. Be bold in Beautiful Soul London's ‘Midori Dress’.

    We featured Beautiful Soul London as part of our Esthetica blog post earlier this year. Based in Notting Hill, Beautiful Soul London is a luxury womenswear label which employs the most exquisite fabrics, including British wool, British lace, organic and Fairtrade fabrics, giving their customers an alternative, more ethical choice that does not compromise luxury. In Beautiful Soul London's statement Ladybird Peach print, the Midori dress is cut from Silk Habotai. We love this piece as it brings a little daring, yet timeless edge to your wardrobe and it is sure to make heads turn!

    2. Climate Revolution Knot Wrap - Lush & Vienne Westwood

    In support of positive solutions to climate change, Vivienne Westwood has designed the Climate Revolution knot-wrap for the natural-beauty firm Lush. In support of positive solutions to climate change, Vivienne Westwood has designed the Climate Revolution knot-wrap for the natural-beauty firm Lush.

    Legendary British designer Vivienne Westwood has joined forces with Lush to create a limited-edition “Climate Revolution” knot-wrap for the holiday season. Woven in Britain from 100% organic cotton, the fabric square can be used as a waste-free alternative to disposable gift wrap, worn as a headscarf or bandana, or even framed as art. We love this product because all the profits from it will go towards funding climate change campaigns and sustainable solutions.

    3. Ba'ali Earrings - Inaaya

    Ba'ali Earrings by Inaaya are hand crafted by women in Khaipur, Pakistan. Ba'ali Earrings by Inaaya are hand crafted by women in Khaipur, Pakistan.

    We introduced Inaaya jewellery to our shop at the beginning of this year and since then they have become one of our most popular brands. This socially conscious brand combines classic Sindhi design and embellishment techniques with artisanal production and interprets them through the lens of contemporary fashion. What's great about Inaaya is that they with female artisans in rural impoverished areas of Pakistan and provide them with jobs and income, helping to bring a positive change in their lives.

    4. 'Putting The "Kind" In Mankind' White Tee - Black Score & People Tree

    Ethical fashion brand People Tree has collaborated with designer Simeon Farrar and his quirky slogan T-shirt label Black Score on a capsule collection. Ethical fashion brand People Tree has collaborated with designer Simeon Farrar and his quirky slogan T-shirt label Black Score on a capsule collection.

    People Tree is recognised both by customers and fashion industry experts as a pioneer in Fairtrade and environmentally sustainable fashion. For over twenty years, People Tree has partnered with Fairtrade artisans and farmers in the developing world to produce a collection of ethical and eco fashion. Recently,  People Tree collaborated with designer Simeon Farrar and his label Black Score to create a range of playful political t-shirts and sweatshirts featuring sketches of animals with cheeky captions such as ‘Putting the "Kind" in Mankind’ and ‘Didn’t need the icecaps anyway, douchebag’. Not only do we love the design, but we also love that it is made from 100% Fairtrade certified cotton, keep with People Tree's high ethical standards.

    5. Blackcurrant Liquorice Aimee Shorts - Who Made Your Pants?

    Who Made Your Pants? is a campaigning lingerie brand who are passionate about two things - amazing pants, and amazing women. Who Made Your Pants? is a campaigning lingerie brand who are passionate about two things - amazing pants, and amazing women.

    Based in Southampton, UK, Who Made Your Pants? is a campaigning lingerie brand who are passionate about amazing pants and amazing women. Their philosophy is that every day should be a good pants day, and that there should be a little bit of gorgeous under everyone's clothes, something just for them. WMYP buy fabrics that have been sold on by big underwear companies at the end of season, stop them ending up as waste and turn them into amazing underwear that have a great start in life. Moreover, they employ women who have had a hard time and provide them with the training and skills they need to get ahead. That's what we love about WMYP products, every time you buy a pair of our pants, you're keeping another woman in a job.

    6. Plum Sateen Supa-Skinny Jeans - Monkee Jeans

    Monkee Genes is the first and only jeans label to have unique mix of astute acreditations from The Soil Association and the Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS). Monkee Genes is the first and only jeans label to have unique mix of astute acreditations from The Soil Association and the Global Organic Textile Standards (GOTS).

    Monkee Genes was born in 2006 out of a frustration and boredom with the jeans market and offers a fresh, vibrant and youthful direction. Their ethos is to manufacture with conscience and without sweatshop labour. In a world of cheap and disposable fashion manufactured without soul or identity, Monkee Genes offers an antithesis. We love their innovative fits and style lines in top of the range fabrics, classic denims with a retro twist  in pop art inspired colours.

    7. Mini Straight Diskette Pop Black Clutch - Sarah's Bag

     Sarah’s Bag is an intimate line of hand crafted, custom-made women’s fashion accessories which are stylishly aware and socially responsible. Sarah’s Bag is an intimate line of hand crafted, custom-made women’s fashion accessories which are stylishly aware and socially responsible.

    Sarah's Bag was another socially responsible brand we added to the Fashion ComPassion shop this year. Described as feminine, fresh and fashionable, this brand aims to be distinctive, vivacious, and elegant with a hint of retro glamour and street-wise sensibility. Sarah's bag allows women at risk from economic deprivation or the stigma of having served time in prison to learn valuable skills in return for a reliable income and a stable source of pride, dignity, and empowerment. We love the Mini Straight Diskette Pop Black Clutch because of its eye catching design and bright colours!

    8. Dip Dye Socks - The North Circular

    The North Circular's Dip Dye Socks. Made from 100% British Wensleydale Wool, hand-knit in the UK. The North Circular's Dip Dye Socks. Made from 100% British Wensleydale Wool, hand-knit in the UK.

    The North Circular utilises the talents of grandmothers and fashion models to create knitwear 'over rich tea biscuits and gossip'. Founded by models Lily Cole and Katherine Poulton, The North Circular sees contemporary knitwear exclusively made from rescued Wensleydale sheep, with the expert hand knitting skills of  'grannies, girls. …and a few strong men'. This brand wanted to return value to the hand made product, personalise the process of production, rekindle the relationship between the producer and the purchaser - knitter and scarf wearer. Not only do we love simplicity of these hand dyed socks but we also love that it has been made with 100% British Wensleydale Wool, bringing production back to the UK.

    9. Snowflake Alpaca Jumper - People Tree

    Elegant christmas jumper in cream featuring a unique grey and black fairisle snowflake pattern. Made from 100% alpaca wool. Elegant christmas jumper in cream featuring a unique grey and black fairisle snowflake pattern. Made from 100% alpaca wool.

    Ditch the ironic ugly christmas jumper fad with this goregous snowflake jumper from People Tree! Made from 100% alpaca wool, this jumper is made by Minka, a Fairtrade network providing artisans in Peru access to international markets. A great addition to your festive wardrobe that sure to make you stand out from the crowd!

    10. Army Shirt Dress - MIA by Mia Nisbet

    MIA by Mia Nisbet fuses recycled fabrics and traditional Malawian textiles to produce a collection that combines the richness of African textiles with Western styling. MIA by Mia Nisbet fuses recycled fabrics and traditional Malawian textiles to produce a collection that combines the richness of African textiles with Western styling.

    MIA by Mia Nisbet combines traditional Malawian fabrics and upcycled materials to produce a collection that fuses the richness of African textiles with Western styling. Mia works with producers in Malawi to create ranges which turn this challenge into an opportunity. Collections are designed and marketed to the international fashion market and then the profits are reinvested in communities in Malawi as well as in the training and equipment.These one of a kind pieces really make an impact, both visually and sustainably!

    What do you think of our Christmas wishlist? Which is your favourite piece? Do you have a suggestion for our wish list? Let us know in the comments!

  • Guest Blogger of the Month: à la Jode

    Jodie Marie from à la Jode Jodie Marie from à la Jode

    What is the name of your blog?

    à la Jode

    Tells us about your blog and why you started it.

    I’d always loved reading blogs and thought about starting my own but somehow found an excuse not to – I worried I would have nothing to say, nobody would want to read it or I wouldn’t have time for it. In the end I decided to just go for it and now I can’t imagine ever giving it up! I soon became addicted to the sense of solidarity and community within the blogging world and love being able to share something I love with others who love it too. Blogs are an amazing way to discover new brands, find limitless inspiration and discuss everything that’s going on in the fashion industry.

    Why is sustainable fashion so important?

    It’s 2013 and there’s no excuse for fashion to not be sustainable. As much as I love to follow catwalk trends, I’ve never believed in completely changing my wardrobe every season or throwing away anything that’s in good condition – I keep all my clothes until they really have no life left in them at all! It’s great that ‘fast fashion’ allows us to have such an enormous variety of clothes to choose from all the time, but there are plenty of inexpensive brands that prove fashion can still be socially and environmentally responsible.

    How would you describe your style / fashion sense?

    Somebody describes my style as ‘modern’ the other day… I quite liked that! I’ve never really thought of myself as having a particularly consistent style; I’m inspired by new things all the time and love to mix it up. I generally avoid buying into trends that I know won’t last and my wardrobe is mostly a mix of classic staples and bolder pieces I loved.

    What are your favourite ethical brands and why?

    Since discovering People Tree at the Clothes Show Live many, many years ago, I’ve always been a big fan. Other brands I love include Monkee Genes, who offer every style and colour of (organic) jeans you could possibly want, and FAIR + True, whose designs come in great colours and prints. If I lived in Australia I would also be buying a LOT of Ginger & Smart – I love every single item they have for sale. I also love Stella McCartney for staying true to her ethical and sustainable beliefs within the designer market.

    What are your top tips for buying ethical and sustainable products?

    Do some research to discover ethical and sustainable brands - there are loads out there! If you’re not sure where to start, there are hundreds of bloggers who focus on ethical fashion. Look for brands that give something back. Look for sustainable fabrics such as linen, wool and organic cotton. Brands don’t have to be specialist within the ‘ethical fashion’ category to actually employ ethical practice. Sustainable fashion is becoming more prominent that ever before so take advantage of the increasing number of brands appearing on the market. And remember – vintage and other second-hand clothing is the most environmentally friendly of all.

    What are your 3 top picks of the Fashion Compassion website?

    Jodie’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Palestyle Fuchsia Glam Clutch (£230), Bhalo Streamer Skirt (£110) and Soieries du Mékong Jodie’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Palestyle Fuchsia Glam Clutch (£230), Bhalo Streamer Skirt (£110) and Soieries du Mékong Raison Fine Silk Shawl (£72).

    I love the Palestyle Fuchsia Glam Clutch - it’s a great statement piece and, as an Arabic speaker, I love the calligraphy detail. The Streamer Skirt from Bhalo is another favourite as it’s an easy-to-wear piece that would fit into any wardrobe. I’m also completely in love with the colours of the Raison Fine Silk Shawl, made by Soieries du Mékong – everybody needs a brightly-coloured silk scarf!

    Check out Jodie’s à la Jode blog here.

    Jodie is also on Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Lookbook and Instagram.

  • The True Cost Documentary Kickstarter - Do You Know The True Cost Of Your Clothes?

    Do YOU know the true cost of your clothes? Andrew Morgan does. And he wants to tell you the whole story.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FszV8O0zP-0

    'The True Cost' is an up and coming documentary film exploring the impact of the global clothing industry on people and the planet. While the price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, human rights and environmental costs have grown dramatically. It is the goal of this film to make those costs vividly clear as we explore how we got here, the damage being done, and the hope filled prospect of choosing a different future.

    Andrew Morgan is a director focused on telling stories for a better tomorrow. Andrew Morgan is a director focused on telling stories for a better tomorrow.

    Clothing is the most labour dependent global industry in the world, employing millions of the world’s poorest workers of which more than 80% are women. Many of these women are paid less than a living wage, work in unsafe conditions, and are deprived of basic human rights.

    Growing up in America, Andrew never gave much thought to where his clothes came from. But as he began to learn more about the people and places behind the labels in his closet, Andrew was shocked by what he found. Growing up in America, Andrew never gave much thought to where his clothes came from. But as he began to learn more about the people and places behind the labels in his closet, Andrew was shocked by what he found.

    By outsourcing the labour to developing countries, the price consumers pay for clothes has seen decades of near steady decline. Because of these low prices, consumers buy more. A lot more.

    Andrew Morgan with Bob Bland in New York. Andrew Morgan with Bob Bland in New York.

    The world now consumes more than 80 billion pieces of clothing a year, making it a trillion dollar annual industry. This rapid consumption has also dramatically increased environmental damage at an alarming rate. America now generates 11 million tons of textile waste each year, not to mention the depletion of environmental resources involved in the production of these clothes.

    The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists including Livia Firth, creative director at Eco-Age and co-founder of the Green Carpet Challenge. The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists including Livia Firth, creative director at Eco-Age and co-founder of the Green Carpet Challenge.

    At the same time, there are record high numbers of worker casualties in factories, and a growing toll on the environment that has been described by experts as fundamentally unsustainable.

    “Almost overnight we have become used to consuming fashion with reckless, addicted abandon, buying more clothes than ever before, reversing centuries of fashion heritage, knowledge and understanding in the process.” - Lucy Siegle, author and journalist. “Almost overnight we have become used to consuming fashion with reckless, addicted abandon, buying more clothes than ever before, reversing centuries of fashion heritage, knowledge and understanding in the process.” - Lucy Siegle, author and journalist.

    But there is hope.

    'The True Cost' documentary is an effort to highlight real solutions that we, the consumers, can all take part in and help make a difference.

    Scott Nova is the executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), an independent labour rights monitoring organisation that conducts investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. Scott Nova is the executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), an independent labour rights monitoring organisation that conducts investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe.

    For the last few months, Andrew has been working on creating a teaser trailer and building a growing team of experts about the world.  Now, he wants to start raising money to begin full production on the final film and has launched a Kickstarter campaign to do so. Funds donated through the Kickstarter campaign will go on principal photography and the post-production process.

    John Hilary serves as the executive director for the War on Want, a UK based organisation focused on fighting poverty in developing countries in partnership with people affected by globalization. The organisation campaigns for human rights against the root causes of global poverty, inequality and injustice. John Hilary serves as the executive director for the War on Want, a UK based organisation focused on fighting poverty in developing countries in partnership with people affected by globalization. The organisation campaigns for human rights against the root causes of global poverty, inequality and injustice.

    The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists from the international clothing community, including Safia Minney, Livia Firth, John Hilary, Lucy Siegle, Scott Nova and many more. In addition to these professionals, the audience will get to see the human side of the issue as Andrew plans to take cameras around the world to capture the lives of the people affected by these issues every day.

    The True Cost Documentary Final Card. The True Cost: The Future Is On Sale.

    Learn how you can be part of the story by checking out 'The True Cost' Kickstarter page!

    Follow 'The True Cost' on Twitter - @TrueCostMovie!

    Photos courtesy of Andrew Morgan / True Cost.

  • Guest Blogger of the Month: Moral Fibres

    Wendy from Moral Fibres is our Guest Blogger of the Month!

    What is the name of your blog?

    Moral Fibres

    Tells us about your blog and why you started it.

    I blog at Moral Fibres, a site all about sustainable living that's hip, not hippie. I talk about all aspects of green living, from ethical fashion, to seasonal recipes, to saving energy, travelling, and everything in between.

    I've been lucky enough to work in environmental education since I graduated nearly 10 years ago. As I work with people on a daily basis encouraging them to adopt greener behaviours I have heard all the stereotypes and misconceptions about green living. Tree huggers, yoghurt knitters, you name it, I've heard it. A little while ago I was looking for some green blogs to read and it felt that all I could seem to find at the time were sites that reinforced those stereotypes, so I decided to start my own site challenging these misconceptions. And so Moral Fibres was born!

    Why is sustainable fashion so important?

    You just have to look at the terrible tragedy that happened in Bangladesh at the start of the year to realise that our society's love of fast fashion comes at an awful price. And it's not just that one factory - all over Bangladesh and other countries you will find people, many of them children, working in sweatshops in terrible conditions for not even a living wage all so we can buy £3 tops and skirts that we throw out after one wear. I would rather save up and buy classic, rather than fashionable items of clothing, from manufacturers who look after their employees well, house them in decent buildings, treat them fairly, and pay them a living wage, and I think more and more people are realising this too.

    How would you describe your style / fashion sense?

    I don't really follow trends or fashions. After trial and error in my teens and twenties, I know what I like and what does and doesn't suit me. My style is quite girly - I pretty much live in dresses. I own the grand total of one pair of jeans!

    Who do you admire in the world of sustainable fashion?

    I really admire sustainable fashion bloggers. There are some really great ones out there helping to spread the message that sustainable fashion can be stylish and look good, and can be done on a budget too. Sadie from Sadie's Wardrobe and Amelia from One Green Dress are two good examples that spring to mind.

    What are your favourite ethical brands and why?

    I'm a big fan of People Tree. Their clothes are smart, stylish and often quirky. I also love Komodo - they were the first ethical brand I ever shopped with over 12 years ago; and Tom's Shoes for the socially conscious business model. And don't forget Lowie - I could spend all the money in the world on their beautiful clothes!

    What are your top tips for buying ethical and sustainable products?

    The Ethical Consumer website is a good starting point, but my best advice would be to be an active consumer! Don't be afraid to email companies to ask them about their ethics if you are unsure, or if their wording is vague. Email high street retailers too to ask them which of their items are ethical or sustainable to let them know that there is a demand for more ethically sustainably produced clothing.

    What are your plans for the future?

    Moral Fibres is only eight months old at the moment, so I'd like it to grow over the next year or so, with more and more content. And running around with my toddler daughter, trying to be the best mum I can be to her! And growing more of our own fruit and vegetables. It's an addiction once you start!

    What are your 3 top picks of the Fashion Compassion website?

    Wendy’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Bhalo's Grey Folk Skirt (£65), Bhalo's Cloudgazer Skirt (£80) and Bhalo's Pineapple Dress (£80). Wendy’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Bhalo's Grey Folk Skirt (£65), Bhalo's Cloudgazer Skirt (£80) and Bhalo's Pineapple Dress (£80).

    What can I say, I love skirts and dresses!

    Check out Wendy's Moral Fibres blog here.

    Wendy is also on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Fashion ComPassion's Top 5 Picks From Estethica SS14!

    London Fashion Week

    As London Fashion Week draws to a close, we’ve had time to reflect and look back on the wonderful sustainable and eco-friendly collections featured in the Estethica exhibition. Estethica has become one of the industry’s leading showcases of eco sustainable design, supporting over 100 pioneering designers and promoting awareness about ethical fashion around the world. All designers featured in Estethica are chosen for their dedication to sustainability, as well as for their design quality, and must abide by at least one of Estethica’s principles. These include fair trade and ethical practice in the production process, the use of organic materials and the use of recycled and upcycled fabrics.

    Estethica has become one of the industry’s leading showcases of eco sustainable design, supporting over 100 pioneering designers and promoting awareness about ethical fashion around the world. Estethica has become one of the industry’s leading showcases of eco sustainable design, supporting over 100 pioneering designers and promoting awareness about ethical fashion around the world.

    So, without further ado, here are our top 5 sustainable fashion collections which caught our eye at Estethica SS14!

    People Tree – Atelier Collection

    For over twenty years, People Tree has partnered with Fair Trade artisans and farmers in the developing world to produce a collection of ethical and eco fashion. For over twenty years, People Tree has partnered with Fair Trade artisans and farmers in the developing world to produce a collection of ethical and eco fashion.

    People Tree is recognised both by customers and fashion industry experts as a pioneer in Fair Trade and environmentally sustainable fashion. For over twenty years, People Tree has partnered with Fair Trade artisans and farmers in the developing world to produce a collection of ethical and eco fashion. Their SS14 collection, Atelier, presents a bold range of styles, from strapless cuff pant suits to statement evening dresses.

    Designed by award winning fashion designer Tracey Mulligan, the Atelier collection is hand-dyed and hand-woven from 100% Fair Trade fabric. Designed by award winning fashion designer Tracey Mulligan, the Atelier collection is hand-dyed and hand-woven from 100% Fair Trade fabric.

    Designed by award winning fashion designer Tracey Mulligan, the Atelier collection is hand-dyed and hand-woven from 100% Fair Trade fabric, keeping with People Tree’s high ethical standards, providing some of the world’s most marginalised communities with sustainable living.

    The range encompasses intricate designs and classic colours, using the finest hand-woven cotton, organic cotton and hand-woven silk. All embroderies are hand-stitched with stunning glass pearls, glass diamantes and clear glass cubes. The range encompasses intricate designs and classic colours, using the finest hand-woven cotton, organic cotton and hand-woven silk. All embroderies are hand-stitched with stunning glass pearls, glass diamantes and clear glass cubes.

    Bottletop

    Bottletop redefines the notion of ‘luxury’ by creating fashion accessories which promotes true craftsmanship, blend design and technique across cultures and handcrafted aesthetic. Bottletop redefines the notion of ‘luxury’ by creating fashion accessories which promotes true craftsmanship, blend design and technique across cultures and handcrafted aesthetic.

    Bottletop is a London-based charity which is dedicated to design, craftsmanship and culture. Bottletop redefines the notion of ‘luxury’ by creating upcycled fashion accessories which promotes true craftsmanship, blend design and technique across cultures and handcrafted aesthetic.

    Close up of a white Bottletop Anja Bag. Close up of a white Bottletop Anja Bag.

    Through the creation of their recycled collections, Bottletop give artisans in developing countries the chance to support themselves and their families. They reach the wider community through their Bottletop Foundation to ensure a long lasting and more sustainable impact. The Bottletop Foundation supports young people through education projects, which in turn empowers them to take control of own their lives.

    Through the creation of their recycled collections, Bottletop give artisans in developing countries the chance to support themselves and their families. Through the creation of their recycled collections, Bottletop give artisans in developing countries the chance to support themselves and their families.

    Liora Lassalle – Soft Fruit and Hard Lines Collection

    Winner of the Estethica Re-Source competition with Central Saint Martins, Liora Lassalle’s latest collection features energetic and colourful prints sitting playfully within harsher lines, giving the impression of barely contained excitement and boundless enthusiasm.

    Liora Lassalle was last year's winner of the Estethica/Veolia Re-Source competition with Central Saint Martins (CSM). Liora Lassalle was last year's winner of the Estethica/Veolia Re-Source competition with Central Saint Martins (CSM).

    Environmental and social ethics have always been very important to Liora and, at the age of 18, she and a friend set up and taught four upcycling fashion workshops for teens resulting in a charity fashion show. For her latest collection, Liora has used upcycled denim, leather and special hemp blends to produce a lively and dynamic range of garments.

    Liora has used upcycled denim, leather and special hemp blends to produce a lively and dynamic range of garments. Liora has used upcycled denim, leather and special hemp blends to produce a lively and dynamic range of garments.

    Katrien Van Hecke

    Katrien Van Hecke's fashion stands for modern artisanal luxury with a strong focus on silk and hand dyed dresses. Katrien Van Hecke's fashion stands for modern artisanal luxury with a strong focus on silk and hand dyed dresses.

    Katrien Van Hecke is an emerging woman’s wear designer based in Antwerp, Belgium. Her fashion stands for modern artisanal luxury with a strong focus on silk and hand dyed dresses.

    Katrien Van Hecke's collections are produced in Belgium only working with high quality materials that prove their sustainability. Katrien Van Hecke's collections are produced in Belgium only working with high quality materials that prove their sustainability.

    Katrien always starts from raw white materials that she uses as a canvas to find structures and prints. She believes sustainability is the new high fashion. The collections are produced in Belgium only working with high quality materials that prove their sustainability.

    Katrien Van Hecke's hand dyed dresses. Katrien Van Hecke's hand dyed dresses.

    Beautiful Soul – ‘Bee 4 Blossom’ Collection

    For SS14, the Beautiful Soul’s statement print is inspired by blossom and bumblebees. For SS14, the Beautiful Soul’s statement print is inspired by blossom and bumblebees.

    Beautiful Soul is a British, luxury womenswear label based in London's Notting Hill. They employ the most exquisite fabrics, including British wool, British lace, luxury vintage fabrics, sustainable, organic and Fairtrade fabrics and unique signature prints, giving their customers an alternative, more ethical choice that does not compromise luxury.

    Close up of the 'Bee 4 Blossom' print. Close up of the 'Bee 4 Blossom' print.

    For SS14, the Beautiful Soul’s statement print is inspired by blossom and bumblebees. Their “Bee 4 Blossom” collection includes the brand’s best selling dresses and playsuits, with the addition of a range of covetable separates including tops, shorts, trousers, skirts and a shirt coat and shirt jacket.

    So what do you think? Which of our top picks stand out to you? Let us know in the comments!

    Check out our entire Estethica photo album here!

    Ayesha Mustafa, Founder and Director of Fashion ComPassion, at London Fashion Week! Ayesha Mustafa, Founder and Director of Fashion ComPassion, at London Fashion Week!

  • Guest Blogger of the Month: Laurenella

    Guest Blogger of the Month - Laurenella.

    What is the name of your blog?

    Laurenella

    Tells us about your blog and why you started it.

    I started blogging at the beginning of my last year of my undergraduate degree. I'd been reading various fashion blogs for about a year before then and finally decided to just start my own! My first few posts were dire - badly lit outfit photos against my bedroom wall taken on a half broken camera, but the only way from there was up!

    Why is sustainable fashion so important?

    I have to admit, as a student I haven't really paid much attention to whether my fashion is sustainable or not, throughout university I have very much been one for disposable fashion bought as cheaply as possible. Now that I'm a bit more grown-up(?) though I'm starting to realise that supporting sustainable fashion brands and designers is a really easy way to make your own personal bit of difference to the world around us. I'm hoping that as sustainable fashion stays in the public eye more companies will start to think more about where and how their products are created.

    How would you describe your style / fashion sense?

    A lot of people I know have described my fashion sense as 'quirky'. I like a lot of bold prints, loud colours and statement jewellery. I'm never quite sure if its an insult or a compliment when someone says to me "Ooh I could never wear that!". I'd say I follow fashion trends but not blindly. If I look absolutely horrific in something *coughdiscopantscough* then nothing will persuade me to buy it!

    Who do you admire in the world of fashion?

    At the moment I really admire Victoria Beckham. I think its really inspiring how she's gone from being a bit of a joke singer to being a really well established fashion designer. I also desperately want a work wardrobe filled to the brim with some of her dresses.

    What are your favourite ethical brands and why?

    People Tree came to my attention back when they had Emma Watson model and design for them in 2011 and since then I've found a number of pieces on their website that I've fallen in love with. They aren't cheap, but I'm looking forward to buying some office friendly dresses from there with my first paycheque!

    Also from what I've seen and read New Look is one of the better high street stores when it comes to their sustainability, something that makes me even happier about the money that I've spent in there over the years! I've always found New Look to be on trend and much more reasonably priced than some other high street brands and I've amassed quite a collection of dresses from there over time!

    What are your top tips for buying ethical and sustainable fashion products?

    I'm not sure I can pass this off as a top tip because I don't actually follow this advice myself at the moment, but as soon as I have a proper full time job and a salary I'm going to start building up the ultimate capsule wardrobe filled with well made and classics items like the perfect jeans and a timeless trench coat. I will have a Pinterest-able wardrobe one day!

    What are your plans for the future?

    Right now my only plan is to finish my MA dissertation. I have a week to go and its slowly draining the life out of me! After that I'm looking forward to getting a job, moving in with my boyfriend and of course keeping blogging going on the side!

    What are your 3 top picks of the Fashion Compassion website?

    Lauren’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Beshtar Tribal Silk Dress (£200), GUNAS Admiral Baguette Clutch (£260) and Kasturjewels White Sapphire Studs (£110). Lauren’s 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion’s website – Beshtar Tribal Silk Dress (£200), GUNAS Admiral Baguette Clutch (£260) and Kasturjewels White Sapphire Studs (£110).

    I'm completely in love with the Admiral Baguette Clutch and I think the Tribal Silk Dress would be perfect for a holiday in the sun. The jewellery is my favourite though and these White Sapphire Studs are perfect!

    Check out Lauren's Laurenella blog here.

    Lauren is also on Twitter and YouTube.

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