International Delivery to 60+ Countries

Tag Archives: Lucy Siegle

  • Be Fashionable, Be Ethical

    EcoFriendly_Fashionista

    Today, Fashion ComPassion gives you some fun and easy tips to be an Eco-Friendly Fashionista !! Enjoy !

    1 : Buy organic and locally as much as you can (food, make up, clothes...). It’s better for your health and for the planet !

    Organic_1

    2 : Invest in vintage...

    ...Give old dresses a new look or swap clothes with friends and family and wear it in a completely new style

    3 : Said goodbye to fast fashion ... like you must say goodbye to fast food

    Quotes_FastFashion

    4 : And said hello to vegan fashion !

    At Fashion ComPassion, our vegan products are made from textiles that are animal friendly and not a by-product of the leather, wool and fur trade. The brands we showcase like Angela & Roi and Krže Studio use alternatives that include waxed cotton, peace silk, bamboo and recycled plastic bottles. And to top it off they are uber stylish!

    Vegan_brands_FC1

    5 : Like wonderful Stella McCartney said, NO FUR ANYMORE

    Fur_SMC_FC1

    6: Open your eyes to the true story of Fashion with reading the book of Lucy Siegle, To Die For: Is Fashion Wearing Out the World?

    LucySiegle

    7 : REALLY DO THEM!

  • The True Cost Documentary Kickstarter - Do You Know The True Cost Of Your Clothes?

    Do YOU know the true cost of your clothes? Andrew Morgan does. And he wants to tell you the whole story.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FszV8O0zP-0

    'The True Cost' is an up and coming documentary film exploring the impact of the global clothing industry on people and the planet. While the price of clothing has been decreasing for decades, human rights and environmental costs have grown dramatically. It is the goal of this film to make those costs vividly clear as we explore how we got here, the damage being done, and the hope filled prospect of choosing a different future.

    Andrew Morgan is a director focused on telling stories for a better tomorrow. Andrew Morgan is a director focused on telling stories for a better tomorrow.

    Clothing is the most labour dependent global industry in the world, employing millions of the world’s poorest workers of which more than 80% are women. Many of these women are paid less than a living wage, work in unsafe conditions, and are deprived of basic human rights.

    Growing up in America, Andrew never gave much thought to where his clothes came from. But as he began to learn more about the people and places behind the labels in his closet, Andrew was shocked by what he found. Growing up in America, Andrew never gave much thought to where his clothes came from. But as he began to learn more about the people and places behind the labels in his closet, Andrew was shocked by what he found.

    By outsourcing the labour to developing countries, the price consumers pay for clothes has seen decades of near steady decline. Because of these low prices, consumers buy more. A lot more.

    Andrew Morgan with Bob Bland in New York. Andrew Morgan with Bob Bland in New York.

    The world now consumes more than 80 billion pieces of clothing a year, making it a trillion dollar annual industry. This rapid consumption has also dramatically increased environmental damage at an alarming rate. America now generates 11 million tons of textile waste each year, not to mention the depletion of environmental resources involved in the production of these clothes.

    The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists including Livia Firth, creative director at Eco-Age and co-founder of the Green Carpet Challenge. The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists including Livia Firth, creative director at Eco-Age and co-founder of the Green Carpet Challenge.

    At the same time, there are record high numbers of worker casualties in factories, and a growing toll on the environment that has been described by experts as fundamentally unsustainable.

    “Almost overnight we have become used to consuming fashion with reckless, addicted abandon, buying more clothes than ever before, reversing centuries of fashion heritage, knowledge and understanding in the process.” - Lucy Siegle, author and journalist. “Almost overnight we have become used to consuming fashion with reckless, addicted abandon, buying more clothes than ever before, reversing centuries of fashion heritage, knowledge and understanding in the process.” - Lucy Siegle, author and journalist.

    But there is hope.

    'The True Cost' documentary is an effort to highlight real solutions that we, the consumers, can all take part in and help make a difference.

    Scott Nova is the executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), an independent labour rights monitoring organisation that conducts investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. Scott Nova is the executive director of the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), an independent labour rights monitoring organisation that conducts investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe.

    For the last few months, Andrew has been working on creating a teaser trailer and building a growing team of experts about the world.  Now, he wants to start raising money to begin full production on the final film and has launched a Kickstarter campaign to do so. Funds donated through the Kickstarter campaign will go on principal photography and the post-production process.

    John Hilary serves as the executive director for the War on Want, a UK based organisation focused on fighting poverty in developing countries in partnership with people affected by globalization. The organisation campaigns for human rights against the root causes of global poverty, inequality and injustice. John Hilary serves as the executive director for the War on Want, a UK based organisation focused on fighting poverty in developing countries in partnership with people affected by globalization. The organisation campaigns for human rights against the root causes of global poverty, inequality and injustice.

    The documentary will feature exclusive interviews with top industry experts and activists from the international clothing community, including Safia Minney, Livia Firth, John Hilary, Lucy Siegle, Scott Nova and many more. In addition to these professionals, the audience will get to see the human side of the issue as Andrew plans to take cameras around the world to capture the lives of the people affected by these issues every day.

    The True Cost Documentary Final Card. The True Cost: The Future Is On Sale.

    Learn how you can be part of the story by checking out 'The True Cost' Kickstarter page!

    Follow 'The True Cost' on Twitter - @TrueCostMovie!

    Photos courtesy of Andrew Morgan / True Cost.

  • Fashion ComPassion's Top 10 Women Who Changed The Face Of Fashion

    Last week, millions of people across the globe came together to celebrate women and their achievements as a part of International Women’s Day. Here at Fashion ComPassion, we were inspired to think of the innovative and influential women who have played a part in the history of fashion, bringing positive change to the catwalks, and to wardrobes worldwide; here's our Top 10 Female Fashion Heavyweights.

    1. Livia Firth

    Livia Firth Livia Firth - Creative director of Eco Age and co founder of the Green Carpet Challenge. (Image via My Green Style)

    Livia Firth is the creative director of Eco Age, an online magazine and boutique which combines glamour with ethics. Since teaming up with eco journalist Lucy Siegle to launch the Green Carpet Challenge in 2009, Livia has been championing sustainable style and innovation at some of the world’s biggest red carpet events. Firth claims that fashion has an important role in promoting social justice, environmental integrity and brilliant ethical design with a conscious. As a bonus, she gets to be married to Mr Darcy...

    2. Lucy Siegle

    Lucy Siegle Lucy Siegle - Journalist and broadcaster specialising in environmental and social justice. (Image via Daisy Green Magazine) 

    Lucy Siegle is an journalist and broadcaster specialising in environmental and social justice. As well as writing her weekly ethical living column in the Observer, Lucy is a regular contributor to ‘Grazia’, the ‘Guardian’, the ‘New Statesman’, ‘Elle’ and ‘New Consumer’ magazine. Her recent book, ‘To Die For: Is Fashion Wearing Out the World?’, offers readers an unflinching look at the darker side to  the fashion industry and its environmental and social impact on the planet. A must read!

    3. Orsola De Castro

    Orsola de Castro Orsola de Castro - Founder of ethical fashion label From Somewhere and Estethica. (Image via the Guardian) 

    Orsola De Castro is an internationally recognised innovator and opinion leader in sustainable fashion. Her revolutionary label, From Somewhere, was the first fashion brand to address the issue of  reproducibility in recycling and pre-consumer waste for the fashion industry. In 2006, Orsola, along with her partner Filippo Ricci, founded Estethica - the sustainable fashion exhibition at London Fashion Week. Estethica has gone onto become one of the industry’s leading showcases of eco sustainable design.

    4. Bibi Russell

    Bibi Russell Bibi Russell - Bangladeshi fashion designer and former international model. (Image via Images of Asia)

    Bibi Russell is a former international model and Bangladeshi fashion designer. In 1994, Bibi opened her own fashion company, Bibi Productions, in Bangladesh with the desire of infusing indigenous Bengali cultural elements into her designs. Her aim was to demonstrate the immense skills and expertise of local artisans, to preserve the heritage and foster creativity, to provide employment opportunities and to contribute towards the eradication of poverty.

    5. Stella McCartney

    Stella McCartney Stella McCartney - award winning British fashion designer and supporter of PETA. (Image via Financial Times) 

    Stella McCartney barely needs an introduction; an award winning British fashion designer, she is best known for her signature style of razor sharp tailoring, natural confidence and sexy femininity. As a lifelong vegetarian and supporter of PETA, Stella does not use any leather or fur in her garments or accessories. In 2006, she launched her vegan-friendly line of accessories that fuse natural and man made materials with high quality construction.

    6. Vivienne Westwood 

    Vivienne Westwood Vivienne Westwood - Iconic British fashion designer and political activist. (Image via MyZeroWaste.com)

    Vivienne Westwood is one of the most iconic British fashion designers of the last 30 years. Her influential designs and merchandise have often been linked or inspired by her many political causes such as CND, climate change and the civil rights group Liberty. A definite fashion matriarch!

    7. Safia Minney 

    Safia Minney Safia Minney - Founder of Fair Trade and environmental fashion label People Tree. (Image via People Tree)

    Safia Minney is founder of Fair Trade and environmental fashion and lifestyle label People Tree. Safia’s lifelong interests in social justice, trade and environmental issues lie at the very heart of her Fair Trade business and, as a result, she is regarded as one of the world’s foremost commentators of Fair Trade in the fashion industry. Her label, People Tree, aims to improve the lives and environment of the artisans and farmers in developing countries who work to make the products whilst providing their customers with desirable high quality fashion.

    8. Ali Hewson

    Ali Hewson Ali Hewson - co-founder of Edun. (Image via Victoria Mary Clarke Wordpress)

    Ali Hewson is the co-founder of Edun, a global fashion brand created to encourage trade in Africa. Ali’s label aims to bring about positive change in Africa through a fair trade-based relationship rather than by direct aid, helping to build long term, sustainable opportunities by supporting manufacturers, infrastructure and community building initiatives.

    9. Sass Brown

    Sass Brown is a full-time professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York who specialises in ethical design practices in fashion businesses. Sass has created collections for a number of manufacturers, from urban clothing to her own signature collection of women's designer sportswear. She has also worked with women's cooperatives in Latin America, most notably COOPA-ROCA in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and taught workshops to manufacturers and fashion enterprises in Peru. Sass's book, Eco Design, showcases some of the best expressions of eco fashion around the globe.

    10. Summer Rayne Oakes

    Summer Rayne Oakes Summer Rayne Oakes - Co-founder of Source4Style and managing Editor of Above Live. (Image via summerrayne.net)

    Summer Rayne Oakes is a model-activist and TV media host. She is one of the co-founder of Source4Style, a B2B online marketplace for sustainable materials; and the Managing Editor and EVP of Sustainability of Above Live, a digital platform highlighting global influencers and their environmental passions. Her 2012 environmental short film, eXtinction, highlighted some of the greatest environmental challenges happening in the world right now and recieved critical acclaim from critics.

  • Guest Blogger of the Month: Sadie's Wardrobe

    Sadie from Sadie's WardrobeWhat is the name of your blog?

    Sadie's Wardrobe

    Tells us about your blog and why you started it.

    I started my blog way back in April 2009, when I was just starting to get interested in fashion. I had been reading a lot of other blogs at the time and really wanted to make one of my own! It’s a good ‘creative’ outlet, where I often feature little DIYs and sewing projects. I recently ‘rebranded’ it as an ethical blog, although it has always featured lot of vintage & thrifted items.

    Why is sustainable fashion so important?

    Fast fashion is very much the norm, and I really didn’t think twice about it before I read Lucy Siegle’s book ‘To Die For’. For me, the importance of sustainable fashion is definitely something that needed pointing out. Since reading the book, I just don’t think I can go back to buying cheap disposable clothes. The way I see it is that in a world of finite resources and growing population, we really can’t afford to keep producing clothing at the rate we do. At the same time, fashion is such an important cultural symbol. So I think the best solution at the moment is to make it as sustainable as possible.

    How would you describe your style / fashion sense?

    I’m not really sure how I’d describe my fashion sense! I tend to wear a lot of bright colours and 70s blouses, and I’d say I’m very influenced by 60s mod style. But since moving to Paris, a lot more grey and 'texture' has been creeping into my wardrobe.

    Who do you admire in the world of sustainable fashion?

    Anyone who has decided that they want to do something about sustainability issues and managed to achieve it, no matter how big or small!

    What are your favourite ethical brands and why?

    The first ethical brand I really became aware of was People Tree, and they are still one of my favourites. I love that they are able to produce clothes that are ethical but still fashionable (and affordable!). I’m discovering new brands every day, which is really really encouraging. Sites like Fashion Compassion are really useful for discovering new brands!

    What are your top tips for buying ethical and sustainable products?

    My top tip for buying ethical and sustainable products is to look for companies whose philosophy is based around being ethical, and that way you know it is genuinely important to them. It’s also good to buy second hand, as this has very little environmental impact, but I try to remember to support the ethical companies too, or they can’t continue to exist!

    What are your 3 top picks of the Fashion Compassion website?

    Sadie's 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion's website! Sadie's 3 top picks from Fashion ComPassion's website - Pineapple dress (£80), Saturday shirt (£65) & Pocket skirt (£80).

    I really love the 50s-style Pineapple summer dress by Bhalo. Wouldn’t mind one for a holiday wardrobe! The pastel coloured panels on the Bhalo Pocket skirt give it a really cool twist. I love the fact that it has hand-made coconut buttons! For lovers of mod fashion such as myself, this Bhalo Saturday shirt is perfect. Again, I’m a big fan of the contrasting pastel-coloured sections!

    Sadie Wardrobe is also on twitter: @sadieswardrobe

4 Item(s)