International Delivery to 60+ Countries

De-Jargoning

  • November: Red is for Rememberance

    Remembering Victims of the Fashion Industry

    As the month of November brings with it a defiant spirit of remembrance and nostalgia, the Fashion Compassion team would like to reflect on the hardships suffered by many within the supply chains of the Global Textile Industry. In particular, while Fashion brings us choice and a channel to express individuality, it accommodates many shades of grey that remain to be addressed by both political and commercial circles.

    Last year saw the tragic Rana Plaza Diasater in Bangladesh which toke the lives of over 1,138 garment workers, while in 2016, the Syrian Refugee Crisis has brought with it opportunities for unethical human exploitation, as the BBC reported several weeks ago, indicating the dangers of our cultural appetite for fast fashion that replicates the latest seasonal trends, while placing  significant cost on our planet and poorer communities in the developing world.

    Despite the solum tone however, there is still hope, as passionate innovators and creators initiate campaigns to promote sustainability and fair trade, with Brands like HnM and organisations like the Ethical Fashion Forum and the Wage Alliance. So when you pin a poppy to the lapel of your winter coat, or you read of the memorial events that took place this weekend, the ultimate message is to remember not only past lives, but also present ones. The people that make Fashion as an industry possible, from skilled seamstresses and renowned designers to retail employees and garment workers that work 14 hour days. We all have a part to play in this global mosaic.

    Celebrate the month with red adornment and check out our picks from Fashion Compassion!

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  • De-jargoning: Social Responsibility

    The true meaning and significance of a word can often be obsurced by difficult and challenge terminology. In our new weekly feature, ‘De-jargoning’, we explore popular buzzwords and expressions related to the world of fashion in order to find out more about them. This week, we are looking at the phrase ‘social responsibility'.

    De-Jargoning: Social Responsibility. De-Jargoning: Social Responsibility.

    Socially responsibility is the idea that people and organisations have a duty to behave ethically and with sensitivity toward social, cultural, economic and environmental issues. In other words, companies should not be solely focused on maximizing their profits but embrace its social responsibilities to society. Striving for social responsibility helps individuals, organisations and governments have a positive impact on development, business and society with a positive contribution to bottom-line results.

    Many companies, particularly green and sustainable companies have made social responsibility an integral part of their business models. Here at Fashion ComPassion, we strive to work with socially responsible fashion brands from the developing world. We take great care in choosing the suppliers we work with, understanding the story behind each brand and cultivating a lasting relationship with them. We work with our brands to ensure their artisans are continually skilled and trained, thereby securing a sustainable source of income for them. By buying Fashion ComPassion products, our customers are contribute directly to the artisans' socio-economic mobility and making a big difference to the future of their communities.

    Our partnership with the United Nations World Food Programme

    Every purchase from Fashion ComPassion helps empower women through the United Nations World Food Programme Every purchase from Fashion ComPassion helps empower women through the United Nations World Food Programme.

    In March of this year, Fashion ComPassion built on the social responsibility aspect of our business by partnering with the UN World Food Programme (WFP). WFP is the world’s largest humanitarian organisation addressing hunger. Its overall objective is to help improve the lives of the world’s poorest people – people who are unable to produce enough food or do not have the resources to obtain the food they need to lead active and healthy lives.

    Fashion ComPassion has agreed to donate a percentage from the profits from each product sold purchased in 2013 to the WFP, helping to fund a new project which aims to enhance employment prospects for poor women and adolescent girls in the FATA region of northwestern Pakistan, on the border with Afghanistan.

    Find out more about Fashion ComPassion's philosophy on socially responsibility objectives here.

    Find out more about our partnership with the UN World Food Programme here.

  • De-jargoning: Fair Trade

    The true meaning and significance of a word can often be obsurced by difficult and challenge terminology. In our new weekly feature, 'De-jargoning', we explore popular buzzwords and expressions related to the world of fashion in order to find out more about them. This week, we are looking at the phrase 'fair trade'.

    De-Jargoning: Fair Trade. Definition from ‘Fashion A to Z: An Illustrated Dictionary’ by Alex Newman & Zakee Shariff. De-Jargoning: Fair trade. Definition from ‘Fashion A to Z: An Illustrated Dictionary’ by Alex Newman & Zakee Shariff.

    The phrase "fair trade" originated in the 18th century, where it was used to mean legally imported goods. In the 19th century, fair trade was used in reference to the freedom of trade between all nations without tariff restrictions. It was only in the late 20th century  where it came to describe the "movement to promote equity in the financial and power relations between producers and consumers".

    Generally speaking, fair trade is a relatively simple concept; it's about advocating better prices, decent working conditions, local sustainability, and fair terms of trade for farmers and workers in the developing world. By demanding companies to pay sustainable prices (which must never fall lower than the market price), fair trade addresses the injustices of conventional trade, which traditionally discriminates against the poorest, weakest producers. Fair trade, therefore, enables producers to improve their position and have more control over their lives.

    The Fairtrade Foundation

    The Fairtrade Foundation is a charity based in the United Kingdom that works to empower disadvantaged producers in developing countries by tackling injustice in trade. Founded in 1992, the Foundation works with businesses, civil society organisations and individuals to improve the position of producer organisations and to help them achieve sustainable improvements for their members and their communities.

    The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on UK products as a guarantee that they have been certified against internationally agreed Fairtrade standards. The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on UK products as a guarantee that they have been certified against internationally agreed Fairtrade standards.
    The FAIRTRADE Mark is an independent consumer label which appears on UK products as a guarantee that they have been certified against internationally agreed fair trade standards. It shares internationally recognised fair trade standards with initiatives in 20 other countries, working together globally with producer networks as Fairtrade Labelling Organisations International (FLO). The Mark indicates that the product has been certified to give a better deal to the producers involved – it does not act as an endorsement of an entire company’s business practices.
    Find out more about fair trade and the work of the Fairtrade Foundation here.

  • De-Jargoning: Sustainable Fashion

    Like all major multi-national industries, the fashion world comes with its own vocabulary of technical terms and phrases. In our new weekly blog feature, we will look at a specific term related to the fashion industry and find out more about it. Break it down and find out the meaning behind the jargon. And what better phrase to start off this feature than "Sustainable Fashion".

    Sustainable Fashion - A philosophical approach to fashion whereby garments and accessories are produced in a sustainable way (i.e. in a way that could theoreically continue indefinitely without harming the environment), using eco-friendly materials such as organic fibres, eco fibres & recycled yarns, with further consideration given to issues such as energy efficient production, workers’ rights, biodegradable packaging and carbon footprint as a result of transportation. De-Jargoning: Sustainable Fashion. Definition from ‘Fashion A to Z: An Illustrated Dictonary’ by Alex Newman & Zakee Shariff.

    Sustainable Fashion came about in the early 1990s, when the designers saw the negative environmental and ethical impact brought on by the rise of 'fast fashion' sector and started to find ways of reducing it.

    Some of the key events in the Sustainable Fashion movement

    • 1990 - British designer Katherine Hamnett speaks at the UN and calls for more eco-responsbility in the global fashion industry.
    • 1992 - Fashion retailer Espirt launches its Ecollection line.
    • 2001 - Stella McCartney launches her fashion label, establishes sustainable fashion as a serious proposition.
    • 2004 - The Ethical Fashion Show is launched in Paris, followed by Estethica at London Fashion Week two years later, to promote upcoming ethical fashion brands and collections.
    • 2005 - Edun fashion brand is founded by Ali Hewson and Bono, aiming to position itself as a creative force in fashion while bringing about positive change in Africa.
    • 2006 - Marks & Spencer annonces 'Plan A', detailing the company's environmental and ethical goals over a five-year period.
    • 2008 - Christopher Raeburn presents his debt collection, inspired by the challenge of sustainable fashion, featuring reversible recycled garments
    • 2009 - Livia Firth & Lucy Siegle launch the Green Carpet Challenge, bringing eco and upcycled fashion to red carpet events for the first time.
    • 2012 - Copenhagen Fashion Summit is held to mark the Rio+20 UN Sustainable Development Conference.

    So there we go. The sustainable fashion movement has come a long way over the last 20 years, but it is still going strong and its message is just as clear and important.

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